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Professor Shin-Tson Wu featured in OSA news release about blue-phase liquid crystals

A paper in Optical Materials Express titled "Optimized blue-phase liquid crystal for field sequential-color displays" by Professor Shin-Tson Wu, in collaboration with liquid crystal manufacturer JNC Petrochemical Corporation in Japan and display manufacturer AU Optronics Corporation in Taiwan, is featured in a OSA News article "Novel Liquid Crystal Could Triple Sharpness of Today’s Televisions By upping the pixels per inch"

From OSA News:
WASHINGTON — An international team of researchers has developed a new blue-phase liquid crystal that could enable televisions, computer screens and other displays that pack more pixels into the same space while also reducing the power needed to run the device. The new liquid crystal is optimized for field-sequential color liquid crystal displays (LCDs), a promising technology for next-generation displays.

“Today’s Apple Retina displays have a resolution density of about 500 pixels per inch,” said Shin-Tson Wu, who led the research team at the University of Central Florida’s College of Optics and Photonics (CREOL). “With our new technology, a resolution density of 1500 pixels per inch could be achieved on the same sized screen. This is especially attractive for virtual reality headsets or augmented reality technology, which must achieve high resolution in a small screen to look sharp when placed close to our eyes.”

Although the first blue-phase LCD prototype was demonstrated by Samsung in 2008, the technology still hasn’t moved into production because of problems with high operation voltage and slow capacitor charging time. To tackle these problems, Wu’s research team worked with collaborators from liquid crystal manufacturer JNC Petrochemical Corporation in Japan and display manufacturer AU Optronics Corporation in Taiwan.

In the journal Optical Materials Express, from The Optical Society (OSA), the researchers report how combining the new liquid crystal with a special performance-enhancing electrode structure can achieve light transmittance of 74 percent with an operation voltage of 15 volts per pixel – operational levels that could finally make field-sequential color displays practical for product development.

“Field-sequential color displays can be used to achieve the smaller pixels needed to increase resolution density,” said Yuge Huang, first author of the paper. “This is important because the resolution density of today’s technology is almost at its limit.” more...

Posted Wednesday, February 1, 2017

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