Giving to CREOL CREOL, The College of Optics & Photonics

2017 Research Highlights

Two-Photon Gain Nondegenerate Two-Photon Gain in Semiconductors
Lasers operate by stimulated emission, where a single photon is emitted per electronic transition. Two photons, with combined energy matching the transition energy, can also stimulate emission of two additional photons in a process known as two-photon gain (2PG). Just as linear (single-photon) absorption changes into stimulated emission with population inversion, two-photon absorption (2PA) changes into 2PG. The inherent nonlinearity of 2PG gives rise to interesting properties of potential two-photon lasers, such as pulse compression, self-mode locking, and unique photon statistics. Their most exciting feature arises from the fact that there is no requirement on the energies of the individual photons, so long as their sum matches the transition energy. Thus, by choosing a wide-gap semiconductor like GaN, a two-photon laser has the potential to be continuously tunable from the UV to the IR. more...
New IR Sensors New Sensors for Infrared Imaging Systems
Infrared imaging systems encompass a wide variety of technologies and applications. Technologies range from new infrared detector materials and devices to new optical materials and methods. The applications are primarily military, but security and commercial applications continue to grow rapidly as infrared components become more affordable. more...
Curved Image Sensors Curved Image Sensors
Imaging systems have grown to become ubiquitous pieces of technology found in an ever-increasing range of applications including cell phones, self-driving cars, and refrigerators that photograph their insides. This growth has been facilitated by mobile devices, which have driven camera technologies to smaller form factors and lower cost. Despite individual component advances and the transition to digital sensors, the basic design of camera systems have not changed over the past century; a complex lens is designed to flatten the object scene onto a flat image sensor – but this is about to change. more...
MultiPhase IR Materials Enabling new optical functionality through multi-phase IR materials
Chalcogenide glass (ChG) – based optical materials that transmit throughout the infrared (IR) have seen increasing use in a diverse range of infrared optical system. In recent years, traditional IR optical systems for the mid-wave infrared (MWIR) and long-wave infrared (LWIR) based solely on ZnS and ZnSe, Si, Ge, and other semiconductor crystalline materials have progressed towards integration with infrared glass and glass ceramic materials. The growth in their use is a result of greater production (by commercial glass manufacturers) and improvements in the know-how of the optics manufacturing protocols (by optics fabrication houses). more...
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